Photo of a roofing crew installing a new residential roof.

Over My Head

What You Need to Know About Roofing and Insurance Claims

Your Roof And Storm Damage


Typically we see severe storms come in the spring and fall, when the weather changes. This can manifest in the form of strong winds, tornadoes, and hail. While the roofing system is built to withstand this onslaught, eventually it will get to a point where it will sustain damage. Sometimes this damage can be minor and lie dormant for months or years before you notice a problem. This fact amplifies, again, the importance of regular inspections and maintenance. It is for this reason that we have a database of clients who have requested inspections and had no damage. With this database we can return after every severe weather event to ensure that their property was unaffected.
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A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.
A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.
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Wind Damage


Wind damage typically begins with the wind breaking the seal of a shingle, detaching it from the shingle below, and allowing it to flap, crease and eventually break off. Severe wind storms and tornadoes can remove large sections of shingles at a time. Once a shingle has been unsealed, creased or blown off, it should be addressed immediately. Even a single missing tab can result in a leak in your roof, potential for attic mold and eventually drywall or wood damage.

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Wind Damage


Wind damage typically begins with the wind breaking the seal of a shingle, detaching it from the shingle below, and allowing it to flap, crease and eventually break off. Severe wind storms and tornadoes can remove large sections of shingles at a time. Once a shingle has been unsealed, creased or blown off, it should be addressed immediately. Even a single missing tab can result in a leak in your roof, potential for attic mold and eventually drywall or wood damage.
A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.
A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.A photo of wind-damaged roof shingles.
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Hail Damage


Hail damage is typically much harder to identify than wind damage. You will likely be able to spot missing shingles due to wind damage from the ground, but will not be able to see hail damage from the ground. As you can see in the photo sequence, the only immediate result from hail is a slight indentation and loss of granules on the shingle. The long-term ramifications of this can be detrimental to your roofing system, however. Your shingles are made of a fiberglass mat, asphalt and granules (simply put). The asphalt makes up most of the shingle, held together by the fiberglass mat and protected by the granules. Yes, those pretty brown, black, gray, green, blue colors you see are not just aesthetic, but are there to protect the asphalt from harmful UV rays from the sun. Once exposed, the asphalt begins to rapidly deteriorate from those UV rays. Similar to an asphalt driveway that does not get sealed regularly, it begins to shrink and crack. By the time this happens, it will likely be too late to file an insurance claim.

Initial Hits... Over time... Allow for... 

SERIOUS DETERIORATION

A photo of hail-damaged roof shingles.A photo of hail-damaged roof shingles.
A photo of hail damage on a roof.A photo of hail-damaged roof shingles.

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CONTACT US BY CALLING 937-697-5063 OR FILL OUT THE FORM BELOW.


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Contact Us

CONTACT US BY CALLING 937-697-5063 OR FILL OUT THE FORM BELOW.


"*" indicates required fields

Fields above marked with an asterisk are required.

By submitting your information in the form above, you agree to be contacted about your request & other information using automated technology.